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Conservation Areas

Waverley has 43 Conservation Areas, each with its own distinctive character. This includes the buildings, the street scene, different uses and their relationship with open spaces and the wider landscapes.

Conservation Areas (CAs) are areas of special architectural or historic interest, and we want to preserve or enhance their appearance.

Once an area has been designated as a Conservation Area, this covers all the land within its boundary.  Planning control is directed at maintaining the special interest of the entire area.

When determining development proposals, we have a duty to pay special attention to the desirability of preserving or enhancing the character or appearance of a CA.

 

Yes, however as development within a Conservation Area is subject to special planning controls, this means that planning permission is required for some works that would usually be permitted development. 

Demolitions

In addition, there are extra controls over the demolition of structures within Conservation Areas. Planning permission is required for the demolition of any building which is more than 115 cubic meters or a boundary wall. For specific details please see Historic England's guidance.

Not sure if you need planning permission?

If you are not sure whether your proposed works require planning permission, please contact us:

Email: heritage@waverley.gov.uk 

Tel: 01483 523429.

We are currently reviewing a number of our Conservation Areas through Conservation Area Appraisals (CAA). Once adopted, these become a material consideration in the determination of a planning application.

The majority of Conservation Areas within Waverley were designated over 30 years ago. Therefore, as part of the CAA process, the boundaries are reviewed. This ensures that areas which are no longer of special interest are removed, and those which are now of special interest are included. 

Current Conservation Area Appraisals Progress
Great Austins, Farnham Consultation opens 01 October 2021 and closes 12 November 2021
Shepherd and Flock Roundabout, Farnham (proposal to designate a new CA) Designated on 22 January 2021 

 

Conservation Areas in Waverley

Please see below for a list of the 42 Conservation Areas in Waverley, sorted by parish.

View Conservation Areas - interactive map

Visit the Waverley Planning maps page where you can turn on layers to view Conservation Areas.

View Waverley Planning maps

Alfold Conservation Area

Designated: 1970 (extended in 1989)

Conservation Area Appraisal adopted 16 February 2016

Alfold Conservation Area Boundary Map (PDF)

General Character

The historic core to the village lies around St Nicholas Church. A cluster of listed buildings and heritage features, including some historic paving, stocks and a whipping post, retain the original vistas and character of the village which makes it easy to understand how the local community lived and worked in the past. The dwellings which have developed along Loxwood Road, particularly on the northern side, connect the historic building Alfold House to the historic core, and the boundary treatments create an attractive, uncluttered street scene that contributes to the character of the area.

Alfold is one of the few Surrey villages whose historic core is so preserved that it is easy to imagine how the local community lived 100, or even 200, years ago. The historic buildings in Alfold are incredibly well preserved; the listed buildings typify the Surrey vernacular with traditional materials and detailing. The business centre on the northern periphery of the CA retains the agricultural barns (now in use as offices), and the church at the centre of the village is surrounded by heritage features such as the stocks and war memorial that give great understanding to the past way of life.

Alfold Conservation Area Appraisal

Following a public consultation, the Alfold Conservation Area Appraisal was adopted at Full Council on 16 February 2016.  The document includes amendments to the conservation area boundary.

Alfold Conservation Area Appraisal

Download the Alfold Conservation Area Appraisal consultation statement

Bramley Conservation Area

Designated: 1974 (amended in 1990)

Conservation Area Appraisal SPD adopted 2005

Bramley Conservation Area Boundary Map (PDF)

General character

Bramley is a historic village on the important route between Guildford and Horsham. It is a ribbon type development built up either side of this ancient route way through the Low Weald. The houses fronting the road reflect the aspirations of the owners of the time and so there are many good examples of sixteenth, seventeenth, eighteenth and nineteenth century dwellings and commercial properties. The land behind these principal buildings is given over to light industrial and agricultural buildings illustrating the practicalities of village life in the past.

Bramley Conservation Area Appraisal SPD

The Bramley Conservation Area Appraisal was adopted as a Supplementary Planning Document (SPD) on 19 July 2005.  The document includes amendments to the conservation area boundary.

Bramley Conservation Area Appraisal SPD

Download the Bramley Conservation Area Appraisal SPD - Sustainability Appraisal


Birtley Green Conservation Area

Designated: 1989

Birtley Green Conservation Area Boundary Map (PDF)

General character

Birtley Green contains an unspoilt loosely-knit group of varied and interesting buildings. The dwellings range from mid 16th (timber frame), to mid 19th Century houses. There is also a pond to the rear of the Old House which contributes to the rural scene. Approached from the south-east, there is a good view north-west, with the small groups of houses nestling amongst the trees with the hills beyond. There is a significant sense of enclosure with the houses enclosed by the surrounding groups of trees. The relationship of the houses to one another is one of a loose-knit group, set on different levels, some in a prominent position on a raised bank and some being set back amongst the trees.


Thorncombe Street Conservation Area

Designated: 1982

Thorncombe Street Conservation Area Boundary Map (PDF)

General character

Thorncombe Street's buildings are spaced along the lane within an attractive setting of a valley with a well wooded stream and steep banks that has not altered much. An important aspect of this character is the sense of open space between properties, which creates a rural spacious and open feel on the street scene. The character is also emphasised by the tight lanes that run through the hamlet due to the property boundaries and higher land either side. Many of the properties were built using Bargate stone, which shows the local availability of the material.

Munstead Conservation Area

Designated: 1982 (extended in 1997)

Munstead Conservation Area Boundary Map (PDF)

General character

Munstead conservation area contains 10 buildings designed by Sir Edwin Lutyens in the late 19th and 20th century and therefore of architectural interest. The area includes one of his earliest buildings, Munstead Wood, which was built for Gertrude Jekyll and includes a garden landscaped by her.

The reason for designation is to conserve the Lutyens - Jekyll heritage of the area and retain its special character. Munstead House is included because of its connection to Gertrude Jekyll and own architectural merit. Open spaces are also included because of their active role in appreciation of the buildings.

Chiddingfold Conservation Area

Designated: 2007

Conservation Area Appraisal SPD adopted 2007

Chiddingfold Conservation Area Boundary Map (PDF)

General character

Chiddingfold conservation area is a historic settlement formed around a green. The number and age of buildings suggests a fairly important medieval settlement between Guildford and the coast. Pockford Road (formerly known as Rye Street) is one of the historic entrances to the village, it is narrow lane which has an increasing number of open green spaces as you head east, this gives a soft transition from village to countryside over the brow of the hill.

Chiddingfold Conservation Area Appraisal SPD

The Chiddingfold Conservation Area Appraisal (CAA) was adopted as a supplementary planning document (SPD) on 16 October 2007. This included the merging of Chiddingfold and Northbridge Conservation Areas into one.

Chiddingfold Conservation Area Appraisal 

Download the Chiddingfold Conservation Area Appraisal SPD Appendices

Cranleigh Conservation Area

Designated: 1973 & 1983 (extended and combined in 1985)

Conservation Area Appraisal adopted in 2016

Cranleigh Conservation Area Boundary Map (PDF)

General character

In contrast to other conservation areas, this area is very flat with little variation in levels within the conservation area.

It has many buildings of architectural or historic interest, there are also numerous trees including an avenue of Norway Maples which line the common and several other groups of trees or individual specimens which provide a backcloth to the area.

There are three distinctive parts: the historical core to the east with a moat around the refectory, 16/17th century buildings and a 14th century church; a main shopping area and a more rural feel to the west.

Cranleigh Conservation Area Appraisal

Following a public consultation, the Cranleigh Conservation Area Appraisal (CAA) was adopted at Full Council on 19 July 2016. The document included several amendments to the boundary, including a significant extension to the south side of the High Street and the southern part of the common.

Cranleigh Conservation Area Appraisal

Download the Cranleigh Conservation Area Appraisal Consultation Statement

 

Dunsfold Conservation Area

Designated: 1974

Conservation Area Appraisal adopted in 2017

Dunsfold Conservation Area Boundary Map (PDF)

General character

Dunsfold Conservation Area  developed as a narrow ribbon along the western edge of the elongated common. The common still dominates the street scene providing the CA with its feeling of open space and connection with the wider landscape, which is enhanced further by the gaps between dwellings.

Dunsfold Conservation Area Appraisal

Following a public consultation, the Dunsfold Conservation Area Appraisal was adopted at Full Council on 25 April 2017. The document included several amendments to the boundary.

Dunsfold Conservation Area Appraisal

Download the Dunsfold Conservation Area Appraisal Consultation Statement


Dunsfold Church Conservation Area

Designated: 1974

Conservation Area Appraisal adopted in 2017

Dunsfold Church Conservation Area Boundary Map (PDF)

General character

The conservation area is made up of a small compact grouping of dwellings, surrounding the church, which has had little development and therefore has remained distinctly rural. The main village of Dunsfold developed 1/3 mile to the south east, rather than surrounding the church, resulting in this small grouping.

Dunsfold Church Conservation Area Appraisal

Following a public consultation, the Dunsfold Church Conservation Area Appraisal was adopted at Full Council on 25 April 2017. The document included several amendments to the boundary.

Dunsfold Church Conservation Area Appraisal

Download the Dunsfold Church Conservation Area Appraisal Consultation Statement.


Dunsfold Aerodrome

In November 2016, Dunsfold Aerodrome was suggested to us as a possible area to be designated as a Conservation Area. An assessment was undertaken by officers, but it was not considered appropriate to designate.

Elstead Conservation Area

Designated: 1974

Elstead Conservation Area Boundary Map (PDF)

General character

Elstead Conservation Area relates mainly to the listed buildings in the compact historic core of the village. The buildings are varied in age and scale and most are two storeys. The CA is centred around a central green, ‘Elstead Green’, which is enclosed by both residential dwellings and small units of commercial use. The Conservation Area extends along Thursley Road and includes a number of listed buildings, which add to the historic character of the Conservation Area. The Conservation Area is a typical example of a Wealden village, with traditional building styles and materials evident throughout.


Westbrook Green A & B Conservation Areas

Designated: 1981

Westbrook Green A & B Conservation Areas Boundary Map (PDF)

General character

Westbrook Green Conservation Area comprises of two significant areas, the hamlet of Westbrook Green, an informal grouping of almost medieval appearance, and the area around St James’s Church.

Ewhurst Conservation Area

Designated: 1970

Conservation Area Appraisal adopted in 2016

Ewhurst Conservation Area Boundary Map (PDF)

General character

Ewhurst developed as three separate areas, two of which form the CA. These are; an open area at the north end of the village with a small green which is flanked by a group of listed buildings and the Bulls Head Pub, the church and surrounding properties, and Ewhurst Green which forms its own CA. Overtime infill development has linked the two areas within the CA together. However, their distinctly different characters remain evident through the use of different street frontages.

Ewhurst Conservation Area Appraisal

Following a public consultation, the Ewhurst Conservation Area Appraisal was adopted at Full Council on 13 December 2016. The document included several amendments to the boundary.

Ewhurst Conservation Area Appraisal

Download the Ewhurst Conservation Area Appraisal Consultation Statement


Ewhurst Green Conservation Area

Designated: 1974

Conservation Area Appraisal adopted in 2016

Ewhurst Green Conservation Area Boundary Map (PDF)

General character

Ewhurst Green developed as a separate entity to Ewhurst village and as such has its own character. It is defined by the common land which forms a strong boundary treatment with the open scatter of buildings which contrasts with the much closer development in the village. Despite its close proximity to the village, which has been subject to development over the years resulting in its expansion to the south and east, the CA has retained its rural character and setting.

Ewhurst Green Conservation Area Appraisal

Following a public consultation, the Ewhurst Green Conservation Area Appraisal was adopted at Full Council on 13 December 2016. The document included a few amendments to the boundary.

Ewhurst Green Conservation Area Appraisal

Download the Ewhurst Green Conservation Area Appraisal Consultation Statement.

Farnham Town Centre Conservation Area

Designated: 1970 (extended in 1979)

Conservation Area Appraisal SPD adopted in 2005

Farnham Town Centre Conservation Area Boundary Map (PDF)

General character

Farnham Town Centre Conservation Area is a large area with a number of areas of significance. The basic layout and character of the conservation area is determined by the fact that it was built around crossroads, albeit staggered, taking west-east and north-south traffic. The old part of the town centre is characterised by its medieval road system, many refronted old buildings and fine Georgian houses. The most prominent historic public buildings are the Castle, the Maltings and St Andrew’s, all of which make a very important contribution to the character of the CA.

Farnham Town Centre Conservation Area SPD

The Farnham Town Centre Conservation Area Appraisal was adopted as a Supplementary Planning Document (SPD) on 22 February 2005.  The document includes amendments to the conservation area boundary.

Farnham Town Centre Conservation Area Appraisal SPD

Farnham Town Centre Conservation Area Management Plan

In 2012, we worked with Farnham Town Council, The Farnham Society, Surrey County Council and Farnham Castle to produce a conservation area management plan for the Farnham Town Centre Conservation Area (FCAMP). The document seeks to set out how the conservation area will be actively managed to enhance and better reveal its historic significance.

After a public consultation, the document was adopted in October 2012 and is now a material consideration in the determination of relevant planning applications and is used to bring forward relevant environmental enhancements within the conservation area.

Farnham Town Centre Conservation Area Management Plan


Great Austins Conservation Area

Designated: 1993

Great Austins Conservation Area Boundary Map (PDF)

General Character

Great Austins Conservation Area is an example of an estate laid out in the early twentieth century following the garden suburb ideals of the time. Many of the houses are designed in an Arts and Crafts style. Although the area has been more heavily developed the original character remains recognisable with large houses set within well-proportioned sylvan gardens.


Old Church Lane Conservation Area

Designated: 1988

Old Church Lane Conservation Area Boundary Map (PDF)

General Character

The Old Church Lane CA is characterised by modest cottages that sit comfortably within their plots set within a valley. It is the humble scale of these properties that underlie the character of the Conservation Area and is one of the reasons for the area’s designation.


Shepherd and Flock Conservation Area

Designated: 2021

Shepherd and Flock Conservation Area Boundary Map (PDF)

General Character

The area developed along the Guildford Road junction, beginning with buildings that were part of Bourne Mills, which played an important part in Farnham’s 17th century corn market. There has been a small amount of subsequent development along Moor Park Lane since this time, and the area was enclosed by the construction of the Shepherd and Flock Roundabout in the 20th century. The area has retained a distinct rural character unlike that of the rest of Farnham town which surrounds it.

Shepherd and Flock Conservation Area Appraisal

Along with the designation of the Conservation Area, following a public consultation the Shepherd and Flock Conservation Area Appraisal was adopted on 22 January 2021. 

Shepherd and Flock Conservation Area Appraisal

Download the Shepherd and Flock Conservation Area Appraisal Consultation Statement


Waverley Abbey Conservation Area

Designated: 1989

Waverley Abbey Conservation Area Boundary Map (PDF)

General character

Waverley Abbey conservation area has an attractive and distinctive character with two contrasting rural scenes,  particularly of high architectural and historic interest (three Listed Buildings and one Scheduled Ancient Monument).

The first scene consists of the open and spacious grounds of Waverley Abbey House, built in 1723 set in well landscaped grounds, and Waverley Abbey Ruins which was founded in 1128 and was the first Cistercian monastery in England, it has a beautiful setting on the loop of the River Wey and against the wooded hillsides.

The second scene consists of  tightly grouped dwellings centred around Waverley Mill Bridge.


Wrecclesham Conservation Area

Designated: 1973 (extended in 2002)

Conservation Area Appraisal SPG adopted in 2002

Wrecclesham Conservation Area Boundary Map (PDF)

General character

Wrecclesham lies about one and half miles south-west of Farnham and is an old centre of population.  The conservation area centres around the main street of the village where many of its older buildings of architectural or historic interest lie, and Farnham Potteries which was founded in 1873.

Wrecclesham Conservation Area Appraisal SPG

The Wrecclesham Conservation Area Appraisal was adopted as Supplementary Planning Guidance (SPG) at Full Council in October 2002.

Wrecclesham Conservation Area Appraisal SPG

Frensham Conservation Area 

Designated: 1981

Frensham Conservation Area Boundary Map (PDF)

General character

Frensham Conservation Area is characterised as a small, linear settlement along The Street. It largely comprises of 19th century brick cottages lying to the south of the road, with the church dominating the northern side with Wisteria Cottage adjacent.

Further eastwards outside the main cluster of buildings are larger detached dwellings. St Mary’s Church is significant architecturally and historically as a good example of a medieval parish church with later 19th and 20th century alterations. It is also a key component of the conservation area, forming the focal point, with the low, open churchyard surrounding it forming the only green and open space within the conservation area


Millbridge Conservation Area

Designated: 1974 (extended in 1984 & 1989)

Millbridge Conservation Area Boundary Map (PDF)

General character

Millbridge Conservation Area is a hamlet straddling the historic route between Farnham and Petworth. It is located in a rural setting, centred around a crossroads, with a tight knit group of late 19th - early 20th century buildings, with traditional stone wall boundary treatments.

Binscombe Conservation Area

Designated: 1981

Binscombe Conservation Area Boundary Map (PDF)

General character

Binscombe Conservation Area is a medieval hamlet around Binscombe Farm. The farm has a Georgian brick façade but is timber framed at the back, and together with three other timber framed buildings forms a picturesque group in spite of more recent development.


Godalming Town Centre Conservation Area

Designated: 1974 (extended in 1984 & 1989)

Conservation Area Appraisal adopted in 2013

Godalming Town Centre Conservation Area Boundary Map (PDF)

General character

The buildings within the Conservation Area are varied in age and scale; most are 2 storeys, but some are 3 storeys. The buildings date mainly from 17th – 19th centuries sometimes masking earlier frames. The streets are relatively narrow and have predominantly domestic scale buildings on either side offering a good sense of enclosure. The streets gently meander at certain locations. The “Pepperpot” or Old Town Hall sits in a prominent position at the junction of Church Street with High Street. Church Street has arguably the most character in Godalming with many 17th century timber framed buildings. This street also meanders to reveal the 12th century Grade 1 listed Church of Saint Peter and Saint Paul adjacent to this site. There are many “yards” off the main street that would have housed workshops in the past.

Godalming Town Centre Conservation Area Appraisal

Following a public consultation, the Godalming Town Centre Conservation Area Appraisal was adopted at Full Council on 10 December 2013.

Godalming Town Centre Conservation Area Appraisal

Download the Godalming Conservation Area Appraisal Consultation Statement.


Godalming Crown Pits Conservation Area

Designated: 1984

Conservation Area Appraisal adopted in 2015

Godalming Crown Pits Conservation Area Boundary Map (PDF)

General character

The focus of Crownpits is a small triangular green, overlooked by listed buildings and a number of other attractive stone-built cottages. To the north and east of the green along the Brighton Road, there are also a number of 19th century bargate stone cottages which, in the local context, are of architectural  interest and which together form an attractive and interesting group. It is this group of cottages, within its attractive setting, which gives the area its distinctive character and which merits designates it as a conservation area.

Godalming Crownpits Conservation Area Appraisal

Following a public consultation, the Godalming Crownpits Conservation Area Appraisal was adopted at full council on 14 April 2015.

Godalming Crownpits Conservation Area Appraisal

Download the Godalming Crownpits Conservation Area Appraisal Consultation Statement.


Godalming Navigations & River Wey Conservation Area

Designated: 2000

Godalming Navigations & River Wey Conservation Area Boundary Map (PDF)

General Character

The Lammas Lands is a green space/ meadow within which the River Wey flows.  It is fully accessible to the public and provides a pleasant walk viewing nature. It lies to the South East of the settlement of Godalming and allows unrestricted views of the town from this direction.  The vista shows the town set against tree clad hills and punctuated by the spire of the Parish Church.  For these reasons the area is protected by local policies AGLV, AONB and partial Green Belt and has been designated as a conservation area.


Ockford Road Conservation Area

Designated: 1974

Conservation Area Appraisal adopted in 2015

Ockford Road Conservation Area Boundary Map (PDF)

General character

Ockford Road CA offers evidence of the historic development of Godalming as a market town from the 17th to early 20th century. The buildings illustrate the changing perceptions of this area as a location for housing, ranging from densely built cottages of the 17th century to larger, more prestigious homes built in more spacious grounds in the 18th, 19th and early 20th centuries.  The collection of historic buildings contributes to a highly aesthetic approach to the historic town and forms an attractive area for businesses and residents, as well as providing historic and architectural interest. The conservation of these buildings is important to maintain this aesthetic value and contributes to local distinctiveness. 

Ockford Road Conservation Area Appraisal

Following a public consultation, the Ockford Road Conservation Area Appraisal was adopted at Full Council on 21 July 2015. The document includes amendments to the conservation area boundary.

Ockford Road Conservation Area Appraisal

Download the Ockford Road Conservation Area Appraisal Consultation Statement.

Hambledon A & B Conservation Areas

Designated: 1974

Hambledon A Conservation Area Boundary Map (PDF)

Hambledon B Conservation Area Boundary Map (PDF)

General character

Hambledon A - Hambledon A Conservation Area is a historic village with a dispersed character. Hambledon is a village in an isolated rural location comprising of originally scattered housing with later development adjacent to the lanes that run through the settlement . It grew in size in the nineteenth century as a result of the railway providing easy access from larger settlements and places of work. This resulted in labourers’ and artisans’ cottages being replaced with, or enlarged into, family homes in generous plots.

Hambledon B - Hambledon B Conservation Area is significant due to it rural character. It follows country lanes, with typical rural boundary treatments in the form of hedging, stone and brick walls, and post and rail fencing. The buildings within the CA are predominantly residential, with dwellings located sporadically along the lanes, with the exception of the Church.

Hascombe Conservation Area

Designated: 1981

Hascombe Conservation Area Boundary Map (PDF)

General character

Hascombe Conservation Area is significant because it is typical of a Surrey hamlet that is linear to Church Road and includes examples of historic buildings typical of the Surrey Vernacular. The Conservation Area is rural in character and is characterised by dwellings located sparsely along the road which do not impede views out to the countryside.

Haslemere Town Centre Conservation Area

Designated: 1974 (extended in 1975, 1985 & 2005)

Conservation Area Appraisal adopted in 2014

Haslemere Town Centre Conservation Area Boundary Map (PDF) 

General character

Haslemere Town Centre CA encompasses the historic core of the town and the oldest of the route ways through the medieval settlement of Haslemere. It is characterised by the Medieval T-shaped pattern of the High Street, Lower Street and Petworth Road, with the Georgian Town Hall at their junction. This historic core has a high proportion of the historic buildings in the town as is to be expected. Many of these historic buildings display the use of local materials including sandstone from the Blackdown area of the Greensand Ridge and clay roof tiles and brick from the Low Weald. It has been split into 3 Character Areas which each hold different significance.

Town Meadow on Lower Street which has open spaces and small groups of typical Surrey cottages.

High Street/ West Street/ Petworth Road/ Shepherds Hill/ Lower Street which is a concentrated area of buildings with shopping and commercial activity many of which are listed which retains the historic element of the area.

Church and Green consists of narrow lanes with high hedgerows, mature trees and an attractive setting of the church and green affording a pleasant seating area.

Haslemere Town Centre Conservation Area Appraisal

Following the public consultation, the Haslemere Town Centre Conservation Area Appraisal was adopted at Full Council on 14 October 2014. The document includes amendments to the conservation area boundary.

Haslemere Town Centre Conservation Area Appraisal

Download the Haslemere Town Centre Conservation Area Appraisal Consultation Statement.


Springhead and River Wey

Designated (Springhead): 1984

Designated (River Wey): 1985

Joined and Conservation Area Appraisal adopted in 2020

Springhead and River Wey Conservation Area Boundary Map (PDF)

General character

The CAs developed along the River Wey - its small size and consistent flow of water was ideal for small water-powered industries. In the 1700s, a network of mills was developed by the Simmons family who mainly used them for papermaking.

The type of buildings, mill ponds and natural and artificial channels along the river still show the clear link with this industrial heritage.

Springhead and River Wey Conservation Area Appraisal 

Following a public consultation, the Springhead and River Wey Conservation Area Appraisal was adopted on 19 June 2020. The document included several amendments to the boundary, principally the joining of the two conservation areas together. 

Springhead and River Wey Conservation Area Appraisal

Download the Springhead and River Wey Conservation Area Appraisal Consultation Statement.

Peper Harow Conservation Area

Designated: 1981

Peper Harow Conservation Area Boundary Map (PDF)

General character

The significance of the conservation area is as an estate originally, which has a very rural and agricultural setting. Buildings include the main house (1765-68), a 13th century church and farm buildings including a granary resting on 25 wooden pillars dating to c1600. Peper Harow Park is a mid 18th century landscape park laid out to the designs of Capability Brown which survives to its full mid 18th Century extend with relatively few alterations. The CA is based around the historic manor of which a 12th century church and 17th century farm remain.


Shackleford Conservation Area

Designated: 1981

Shackleford Conservation Area Boundary Map (PDF)

General character

The Shackleford Conservation Area is located linearly along Peperharow Lane, a typical tree bordered country lane lined with 18th century cottages, and the larger estate of Mulberry House. Originally part of Hall Place estate, this small village contains 18th century farm labourer cottages and 17th and 18th century farm buildings.

Bowlhead Green Conservation Area

Designated: 1983

Bowlhead Green Conservation Area Boundary Map (PDF)

General character

Bowlhead Green Conservation Area is considered as a small hamlet of dozen or so dwellings on elevated ground and remote from larger settlements. It is a former agricultural community with a loose cluster of houses several of which date from the 16th and 17th century set around a village green. There is no church but a former congregational chapel is now converted to a house.


Thursley Conservation Area

Designated: 1970

Thursley Conservation Area Boundary Map (PDF)

General character

Thursley CA character lies in its traditional rural appearance. Thursley is a rural village of traditional appearance with agricultural origins, little has been altered and it has no through traffic. The older southerly section includes the church and Hill Farm and holds the greatest visual charm, when entering the CA from this end, you are treated to an attractive village scene of farm barns with the church spire rising above. The north end centres around a small triangular green, and sees a consistent boundary treatment of mature vegetation and low boundary walls which help to retain the open, rural character.

Tilford Conservation Area

Designated: 1973

Tilford Conservation Area Boundary Map (PDF)

General character

Tilford Conservation Area is an ancient settlement built up around the crossing points and cross roads over the River Wey. It has a loosely nucleated plan similar to other settlements in this part of the borough. The character is predominantly a single building line facing into the settlement with the open countryside behind. It is situated around the triangular green. The village and the evidence of various stages of Tilford’s history from the late middle ages can be seen from the centre. The Street has a typical rural feel, characterised by low stone walls, many with verdant vegetation, mature trees and hedgerows set behind them and forming the boundaries of properties with the roadside.

Milford Conservation Area

Designated: 1981 (boundary altered in 2015)

Conservation Area Appraisal adopted in 2014

Milford Conservation Area Boundary Map (PDF)

General character

Milford Conservation Area is formed around the junction of Portsmouth Road and Church Road, extending in all directions at this junction. The built form is typical of a small rural settlement of historic houses of gentry and labourers cottages. Stone boundary walls are distinctive feature to the Conversation Area.

Milford Conservation Area Appraisal

Following a public consultation, the Milford Conservation Area Appraisal was adopted at Full Council on 18 February 2014.

Milford Conservation Area Appraisal 

Download the Milford Conservation Area Appraisal Consultation Statement.


Sandhills Conservation Area

Designated: 1984

Sandhills Conservation Area Boundary Map (PDF)

General character

Sandhills lies between Wormley and Brook.  At the crossroads and adjacent small open area lies an attractive grouping of 18th and 19th Century cottages including three 16th Century timber framed listed buildings.  This grouping forms the nucleus of the conservation area.  It is also an area, which could be considered for an extension to the west of the conservation area, where it has four listed buildings.


Witley Conservation Area

Designated: 1980

Conservation Area Appraisal adopted in 2015

Witley Conservation Area Boundary Map (PDF)

General character

Witley CA developed along Petworth Road; the main route through from Petworth to Godalming. The core of the CA is at the junction of Petworth Road and Church Lane, where the Grade I listed building All Saints Church stands amongst the local school and Grade II listed building The White Hart Pub. To the north,a cluster of buildings of listed buildings lead up to Lashams, a mid-18th century dwelling. The enclosed 'Miltons Yard' opposite Lashams comprises the only industrial units in the CA. The eastern half of the CA is characterised by the well-maintained private grounds of Witley Manor, the hamlet of Enton Mill and the ponds which connect them.

Witley Conservation Area Appraisal

Following a public consultation, the Witley Conservation Area Appraisal was adopted at Full Council on 21 July 2015. The document includes amendments to the conservation area boundary.

Witley Conservation Area Appraisal

Download the Witley Conservation Area Appraisal Consultation Statement.


Wheelersteet Conservation Area

Designated: 1989

Conservation Area Appraisal adopted in 2012

Wheelerstreet Conservation Area Boundary Map (PDF)

General character

This is a compact area with a great variety of buildings and walls, both listed and unlisted. It is a small, linear and compact conservation area based around the T-junction of Petworth Road and Wheeler Lane. It is typical of a small rural settlement with historic farmhouses, artisan and labourers cottages and a village pub, all heavily influenced by the local vernacular. The area is slightly tarnished by the busy Petworth Road.

Wheelerstreet Conservation Area Appraisal

Following a public consultation, the Wheelerstreet Conservation Area Appraisal was adopted at Full Council on 16 October 2012.

Wheelerstreet Conservation Area Appraisal

Download the Wheelerstreet Conservation Area Appraisal Consultation Statement.

Blackheath Conservation Area

Designated: 1983

Blackheath Conservation Area Boundary Map (PDF)

General character

The significance of the Blackheath Conservation Area is based upon its association with Charles Harrison Townsend, who designed many of the houses in the hamlet as a part of his ‘Free’ movement of Arts and Crafts architecture. Notable contributions include his own house Cobbins, as well as the listed St Martins Church. It has been deemed desirable to include a representative group of his buildings, and Blackheath provides a very attractive setting and also includes a very nice unspoilt group of late 19th century cottages.


Shamley Green Conservation Area

Designated: 1973

Shamley Green Conservation Area Boundary Map (PDF)

General character

Shamley Green CA is a typical South West Surrey village, originally settled in marginal wooded ground and without the need for a tight nucleated arrangement. This ribbon of development along the edge of a Green, with many timber framed houses facing inwards, is illustrative of community settlement. The village has expanded and houses of the eighteenth, nineteenth and early twentieth centuries add to the depth of the significance, illustrating the continued development. The openness within the settlement and between individual houses is a large part of the character of the Conservation Area. Shamley Green is considered to be typical of settlements in the east of the borough with ribbon developments having established along a strip of common land.


Wonersh Conservation Area

Designated: 1973

Wonersh Conservation Area Boundary Map (PDF)

General character

Wonersh's historic centre has changed very little since 1870. The sinuous street contributes greatly to the character of the place and being lined by a considerable number of listed buildings forms the nucleus of  the Conservation area. The area also includes Wonersh Park and its preserved 18th century gateway and  converted stables, the 17th century mansion was demolished in 1935.